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Alcohol Issues Insights

 

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Alcohol Issues INSIGHTS keeps you fully informed about critical alcohol policy issues. Every month,Alcohol Issues INSIGHTS delivers four pages packed with the information you need to answer critics and educate the public. In addition, e-mail subscribers receive 40 weekly updates with the latest news.

Alcohol issues are increasingly on the front burner. Politicians, advocacy groups and the media are turning up the heat even as a large and growing body of scientific research establishes the many health benefits of moderate drinking. These very issues - attacks by anti-alcohol activists and the facts about the health benefits of moderate drinking - have always been the focus of Alcohol Issues INSIGHTS. Here's a small sampling of the news and info you'll get:

In Alcohol Issues INSIGHTS, you'll find exclusive articles. Some detail the latest studies adding to the vast body of research showing benefits of moderate consumption. Others monitor the progress against alcohol abuse. Still others track the latest moves of the New temperance movement.

Beer industry executives find Alcohol Issues INSIGHTS to be both informative and highly readable. Our editors distill key points from often complex material. When the research raises questions, we ask them. When the conclusions don't match the data, we point that out. Expert contacts developed by our editors over the years provide additional legal and scientific perspective. A one year-subscription - that's 12 monthly issues plus 40 weekly updates - is priced at $510 dollars (add $15 outside of US.). As with all our newsletters, we offer a money-back guarantee: if Alcohol Issues INSIGHTS fails to meet your expectations, we will gladly refund the unused portion of your subscription.

 

 

Public health advocates tend to downplay the potential of school-based education programs to reduce underage drinking problems. But two recent reports suggest some programs do work. An evaluation of RAND Corporation

Publishing Info

  • Year 2003
  • Volume 20
  • Issue # 11
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report has already influenced the dialogue between public health advocates, legislators, and the alcohol industry. At two recent events -- a Senate Subcommittee hearing on underage drinking and a Center on Alcohol and Substance Abuse (CASA) panel focused on the future of US alcohol policy -- public health figures argued that the report should be used as a roadmap for US alcohol policy going forward. Advocates at both meetings endorsed the report's familiar propo- sals (excise taxes, availability restrictions and tougher ads regulations), and its new ideas (an industry-funded "independent foundation" to combat underage drinking and national ad campaign targeted to adults). At the same meetings, industry representatives criticized tax proposals, defended alcohol advertising and reminded of the industry's programs to battle illegal use of their products. Yet despite the contentious nature of key NAS proposals, some players on both sides of the issue sought "common ground," and expressed a willingness (and need) to work more closely together towards solutions.

Publishing Info

  • Year 2003
  • Volume 20
  • Issue # 10
A pair of federally-mandated reports, one from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and one from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), plus a pair of national surveys of drinking in the US, put a bright spotlight on underage drinking just as the back-to-school season began. While the FTC report basically praised the industry

Publishing Info

  • Year 2003
  • Volume 20
  • Issue # 9
Beer Institute president Jeff Becker responded negatively to the NAS recommendation: "We’ve always been opposed to linking alcohol with illicit drugs," Becker told Join Together Online (JTO), a news service sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. "Alcohol is a legal product and it would be inappropriate to link them in any substantive way." Becker noted too that a merger might lessen federal focus on important research into alcohol problems and shift it to drugs. Similarly, Distilled Spirits Council president Peter Cressy said a merger could "seriously undermine the unique research contributions" of NIDA and NIAAA. While 100 mil Americans responsibly consume alcohol beverages, Cressy noted, "it is illegal to manufacture, use, sell and purchase illicit drugs and there is no known safe use of tobacco…. Any common questions can be addressed by collaboration." Interestingly, the ex-director of NIAAA, Dr. Enoch Gordis, agrees with Becker and Cressy. "The attention to alcohol would be downplayed," Gordis told JTO. He also pointed to alcohol’s unique characteristics as a substance that is both a drug and a food, alcohol’s individual physiological effects and its legal status, which to Gordis means "the control of its noxious social effects are in a very different manner…than…

Publishing Info

  • Year 2003
  • Volume 20
  • Issue # 8
"The data do suggest that current drinkers have a reduced [risk] for invasive ovarian cancer, especially women who consume at least two drinks daily. This reduction

Publishing Info

  • Year 2003
  • Volume 20
  • Issue # 7
While many advocates continue to use the phrase to describe 5+ drinks per occasion for males, 4+ for females, yet another study of student drinking found those levels did not provide an accurate measure of intoxication. In this study (based on actual BAC levels), 29% of students found to have BAC levels below .08 "would be classified as heavy episodic [binge] drinkers," using the 4+/5+ drink levels. In fact, "only 51.5% of students" who reported drinking 5+ drinks had a BAC greater than or equal to .08. About 1/3 of the students who met the 5+/4+ standard had a BAC level "greater than or equal to" .10. That means 2/3 of those who binged had BACs below .10. The authors wrote: the 5+/4+ measure lacked specificity, had poor predictive value and yielded a high rate of false positives

Publishing Info

  • Year 2003
  • Volume 20
  • Issue # 6
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